Benji Meltzer

From Disrupting Africa
Jump to: navigation, search
Benji Meltzer
Benji-meltzer.jpg
Benji Meltzer. Retrieved from LinkedIn profile, 6 April 2020.
Born1990 (age 30–31)
Cape Town, South Africa
NationalitySouth African
Alma materUniversity of Cape Town
OccupationCTO
Known forCo-founder of Aerobotics
WebsiteLinkedIn Profile

Editor: Tamia Adolph

Benji Meltzer is the co-founder and CTO of South African agritech start-up, Aerobotics. The start-up uses drone and satellite imagery to optimise crop performance for farmers on a global scale. This includes orchard management, problem tree identification and pest and disease management.[1]

History

Growing up, Meltzer had a keen interest in design and entrepreneurship.[2] Furthermore, he states he has always had a passion for data science, analytics and solving problems using innovative technology.[3]

He completed a BSc in Mechatronics Engineering from the University of Cape Town.[4] Thereafter, working as a software engineer and business analyst at Cyest Corporation.[5] Meltzer then obtained his MSc specialising in Neurotechnology at London Imperial College.[6] Upon his return to South African, he joined Uber where he worked as an Operations and Logistics Manager for Sub Saharan Africa.[7]

Meltzer then co-founded Aerobotics with James Paterson in 2014.[8]

Achievements

Meltzer hosted a networking roundtable at the World Agri-Tech Innovation Summit in London, on the topics of artificial intelligence and predictive agriculture.[9]

In 2017, Meltzer and Paterson were granted a joint R8 million seed-funding round from 4Di Capital and the Savannah Fund in Kenya.[10]

In 2018, Aerobotics was chosen as one of 24 startups to be a part of Google’s Launchpad Accelerator in San Francisco, thereby becoming the only South African startup to be chosen.[11] In that same year, the company won the AfricArena VivaTech Challenge and the President Macron Tech Award.[12] As well as the Innovator of the Year award at the All Africa Business Leader Awards.[13]

In 2019, Aerobotics received $2 million funding from Paper Plane Ventures.[14]

References