Jamila Abass

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Jamila Abass
Jamila Abass.jpg
Jamila Abass. Retrieved from Wikipedia, October 2020.
Born1984 (age 36–37)
Kenya
NationalityKenyan
Alma materUniversity of Waterloo
Loyola Jesuit College
OccupationComputer scientist, entrepreneur, Country Director of Give Directly
Known forCo-founder of MFarm
WebsiteLinkedIn Profile

Editor: Tamia Adolph

Jamila Abass is the co-founder and former CEO of Kenyan-based MFarm, an agri-business start-up that provides transparency for farmers on farming prices, buying, market information and current agri-trends.[1] MFarm provides this information to farmers via SMS or a web-based application which is available worldwide for free.

Abass is a computer scientist, software engineer, entrepreneur and businesswoman.

History

Abass had agricultural roots that involved her and her brother planting and selling coriander and kale to neighbours as young children. [2] Her academic achievements led her to study a BSc in Computer Software Engineering from Abdelmalek Essaadi University in Morocco, which she completed from 2005 - 2009. [3] In 2009, Abass began working at the Kenyan Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), where her main responsibility was building a web-based Medical Record System. Abass worked as a Business Development Manager at Akirachix in 2010 before she co-founded and became the CEO of MFarm. Abass and her co-founders, Susan Oguya and Linda Kwamboka, came across the IPO48, a development competition for young entrepreneurs where they won first place for MFarm and used the prize money to start-up the company.[4]

In 2018, Abass was the Head of Growth at WeFarm until 2019 when she joined Give Directly as the Country Director.[5]

Achievements

In 2014, Abass was named as one of Forbes’ 10 Female Tech Founders To Watch In Africa. [6]

In that same year, Abass was named one of The 20 Youngest Power Women in Africa by Forbes.[7]

In 2015, Forbes listed Abass as one of the women for the 2015 New African Woman Women of the Year. [8]

In the same year, Abass was named one of Quartz Africa’s 30 African innovators. [9]

In 2018, Abass was part of Africa.com’s 40 Africans Under 40. [10]

References